• (+98) 21 22181316
    (+98) 21 42167000
  • Unit 27, 5th Northern Floor, IKEAS building, No. 31
    Moghaddas Ardebili Ave., Valiasr St., Tehran
  • Saturday to Wednesday
    8:00 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.
  • DISCOVER WHAT’S POSSIBLE

    Work Together to

    DISCOVER WHAT’S POSSIBLE

  • DISCOVER WHAT’S POSSIBLE

    Work Together to

    DISCOVER WHAT’S POSSIBLE

  • DISCOVER WHAT’S POSSIBLE

    Work Together to

    DISCOVER WHAT’S POSSIBLE

  • DISCOVER WHAT’S POSSIBLE

    Work Together to

    DISCOVER WHAT’S POSSIBLE

Welcome to Yaran Group Website

With more than a decade of experience, Yaran is a manufacturer and supplier of high temperature and high vacuum heating systems. Our excellence, experience and innovation make us your ideal partner in every application in any scale where clean and consistent high temperature vacuum system is mission-critical for better process results.

Also Yaran's expert team provides reliable technical advices since initial steps until final installation and support. Yaran has an unparalleled reputation for reliability, excellence and innovation. Our aim is to provide the advanced technology solutions, quality and service that our customers need.

get in touch with our best support team

Want to contact Yaran Support Team? Here are few ways to get in touch with us.
  • Northern Floor, IKEAS building
    No. 31, Moghaddas Ardebili Ave Valiasr St .Tehran
  • Phone : (+98) 21 22181316
  • Office : (+98) 21 42167000
  • Fax : (+98) 21 42167001
  • Email : info@yaranfurnace.com

Contact our support team

Yaran is here to provide you with more information, answer any questions you may have and create an effective solution for your instructional needs. Please fill out the form below, so we can provide quick and efficient service.

GENERAL QUESTIONS

Take a step forward. Here is what you may need to know about this field.
  • What is vacuum?

    Vacuum is space void of matter. The word stems from the Latin adjective vacuus for "vacant" or "void". An approximation to such vacuum is a region with a gaseous pressure much less than atmospheric pressure. Physicists often discuss ideal test results that would occur in a perfect vacuum, which they sometimes simply call "vacuum" or free space, and use the term partial vacuum to refer to an actual imperfect vacuum as one might have in a laboratory or in space. In engineering and applied physics on the other hand, vacuum refers to any space in which the pressure is lower than atmospheric pressure.The Latin term in vacuo is used to describe an object that is surrounded by a vacuum. The quality of a partial vacuum refers to how closely it approaches a perfect vacuum. Other things equal, lower gas pressure means higher-quality vacuum. For example, a typical vacuum cleaner produces enough suction to reduce air pressure by around 20%. Much higher-quality vacuums are possible. Ultra-high vacuum chambers, common in chemistry, physics, and engineering, operate below one trillionth (10−12) of atmospheric pressure (100 nPa), and can reach around 100 particles/cm3. Outer space is an even higher-quality vacuum, with the equivalent of just a few hydrogen atoms per cubic meter on average. According to modern understanding, even if all matter could be removed from a volume, it would still not be "empty" due to vacuum fluctuations, dark energy, transiting gamma rays, cosmic rays, neutrinos, and other phenomena in quantum physics. In the study of electromagnetism in the 19th century, vacuum was thought to be filled with a medium called aether. In modern particle physics, the vacuum state is considered the ground state of a field. Vacuum has been a frequent topic of philosophical debate since ancient Greek times, but was not studied empirically until the 17th century. Evangelista Torricelli produced the first laboratory vacuum in 1643, and other experimental techniques were developed as a result of his theories of atmospheric pressure. A torricellian vacuum is created by filling a tall glass container closed at one end with mercury, and then inverting the container into a bowl to contain the mercury. Vacuum became a valuable industrial tool in the 20th century with the introduction of incandescent light bulbs and vacuum tubes, and a wide array of vacuum technology has since become available. The recent development of human spaceflight has raised interest in the impact of vacuum on human health, and on life forms in general.

  • What is heat?

    Heat is the amount of energy flowing from one body to another spontaneously due to their temperature difference, or by any means other than through work or the transfer of matter. The transfer can be by contact between the source and the destination body, as in conduction; or by radiation between remote bodies; or by way of an intermediate fluid body, as in convective circulation; or by a combination of these. In thermodynamics, heat is often contrasted with work: heat applies to individual particles (such as atoms or molecules), work applies to objects (or a system as a whole). Heat involves stochastic (or random) motion equally distributed among all degrees of freedom, while work is directional, confined to a specific degrees of freedom. Since heat (like work) represents a quantity of energy being transferred between two bodies by certain processes, neither body "has" a definite amount of heat (much like a body in itself doesn't "have" work); in contrast, a body indeed has properties (state functions) such as temperature and internal energy. Thus, energy exchanged as heat during a given process changes the (internal) energy of each body by equal and opposite amounts. The sign of the quantity of heat can indicate the direction of the transfer, for example from system A to system B; negation indicates energy flowing in the opposite direction. Although heat flows spontaneously from a hotter body to a cooler one, it is possible to construct a heat pump or refrigeration system that does work to increase the difference in temperature between two systems. Conversely, a heat engine reduces an existing temperature difference to do work on another system. Heat is a consequence of the microscopic motion of particles. When heat is transferred between two objects or systems, the energy of the object or system's particles increases. As this occurs, the arrangement between particles becomes more and more disordered. In other words, heat is related to the concept of entropy. Historically, many energy units for measurement of heat have been used. The standards-based unit in the International System of Units (SI) is the joule (J). Heat is measured by its effect on the states of interacting bodies, for example, by the amount of ice melted or a change in temperature. The quantification of heat via the temperature change of a body is called calorimetry, and is widely used in practice. In calorimetry, sensible heat is defined with respect to a specific chosen state variable of the system, such as pressure or volume. Sensible heat causes a change of the temperature of the system while leaving the chosen state variable unchanged. Heat transfer that occurs at a constant system temperature but changes the state variable is called latent heat with respect to the variable. For infinitesimal changes, the total incremental heat transfer is then the sum of the latent and sensible heat.

  • What is Vacuum Furnace?

    A vacuum furnace is a type of furnace in which the product in the furnace is surrounded by a vacuum during processing. The absence of air or other gases prevents oxidation, heat loss from the product through convection, and removes a source of contamination. This enables the furnace to heat materials (typically metals and ceramics) to temperatures as high as 3,000 °C (5,432 °F) with select materials. Maximum furnace temperatures and vacuum levels depend on melting points and vapor pressures of heated materials. Vacuum furnaces are used to carry out processes such as annealing, brazing, sintering and heat treatment with high consistency and low contamination. Characteristics of a vacuum furnace are: Uniform temperatures in the range 800–3,000 °C (1,500–5,400 °F) Commercially available vacuum pumping systems can reach vacuum levels as low as 10−11 Torr (mbar) Temperature can be controlled within a heated zone, typically surrounded by heat shielding or insulation Low contamination of the product by carbon, oxygen and other gases Vacuum pumping systems remove low temperature by-products from the process materials during heating, resulting in a higher purity end product Quick cooling (quenching) of product can be used to shorten process cycle times The process can be computer controlled to ensure repeatability Heating metals to high temperatures normally causes rapid oxidation, which is undesirable. A vacuum furnace removes the oxygen and prevents this from happening. An inert gas, such as Argon, is often used to quickly cool the treated metals back to non-metallurgical levels (below 400 °F [200 °C]) after the desired process in the furnace. This inert gas can be pressurized to two times atmosphere or more, then circulated through the hot zone area to pick up heat before passing through a heat exchanger to remove heat. This process continues until the desired temperature is reached.

  • What are Vacuum Furnaces used for?

    Vacuum furnaces are used in a wide range of applications in both production industries and research laboratories. At temperatures below 1200 °C, a vacuum furnace is commonly used for the heat treatment of steel alloys. Many general heat treating applications involve the hardening and tempering of a steel part to make it strong and tough through service. Hardening involves heating the steel to a predetermined temperature, then cooling it rapidly. A further application for vacuum furnaces is Vacuum Carburizing also known as Low Pressure Carburizing or LPC. In this process, a gas (such as acetylene) is introduced as a partial pressure into the hot zone at temperatures typically between 1,600 and 1,950 °F (870 and 1,070 °C). The gas disassociates into its constituent elements (in this case carbon and hydrogen). The carbon is then diffused into the surface area of the part. This function is typically repeated, varying the duration of gas input and diffusion time. Once the workload is properly "cased", the metal is quenched using oil or high pressure gas (HPGQ). For HPGQ, nitrogen or, for faster quench helium, is commonly used. This process is also known as case hardening. Another low temperature application of vacuum furnaces is debinding, a process for the removal of binders. Heat is applied under a vacuum in a sealed chamber, melting or vaporizing the binder from the aggregate. The binder is evacuated by the pumping system and collected or purged downstream. The material with a higher melting point is left behind in a purified state and can be further processed. Vacuum furnaces capable of temperatures above 1200 °C are used in various industry sectors such as electronics, medical, crystal growth, energy and artificial gems. The processing of high temperature materials, both of metals and nonmetals, in a vacuum environment allows annealing, brazing, purification, sintering and other processes to take place in a controlled manner.

OUR LATEST NEWS

virtual tour of Yaran’s products
05May

virtual tour of Yaran’s products

Were not able to visit the exhibition? Here is a high quality virtual tour of Yaran’s products in The 5th Iranlab Expo. To Enter 3D Virtual Tour Please Click Here
Leasing services
24March

Leasing services

From now on you can have Yaran products and services much easier. Considering our competitive quality and innovative products, Vice-Presidency for science and technology of Iran decided to define a leasing plan for our products
Yaran and Tapka
19February

Yaran and Tapka

In order to strengthen the ability of design and manufacture Industrial Vacuum . Induction Melting furnaces, Yaran Behgozin Parsa Co. signed a partnership agreement . signed a partnership agreement. By the means of this agreement Yaran-Tapka

Innovation is the specific instrument of entrepreneurship The act that endows resources with a new capacity to create wealth.

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